Connective Tissue Grafting

Receding gums is a common condition seen as people age.  It’s most obvious symptom is the movement of gum tissue down the root of the tooth causing the yellow colored middle part of the tooth called dentin to be exposed.  The recession leaves the teeth looking” longer” and allow food to pack between teeth.  The exposed root surfaces, no longer protected by enamel or gum tissue, become more susceptible to decay. Another symptoms is tooth sensitivity usually to cold.

Risk factors which can predispose teeth to recession are: periodontal disease, aggressive tooth brushing, tobacco use, lack of dental care, misaligned teeth, piercings, genetic influences and accelerated orthodontic treatment.  If the source of the recession can be identified and modified, treatment follows often involving soft tissue grafting.

Sub-epithelial Connective Tissue Grafting

The most widely used and predictable method to restore lost gum tissue involves moving gum tissue from the roof of a patient’s mouth or from the third molar area to cover the exposed root.  Please visit our Smile Gallery to see before and after examples.

Grafting Technique Using Platelet Rich Fibrin

A new treatment using a small amount of the patient’s blood to create Platelet Rich Fibrin is used as donor tissue rather than palatal or third molar donor site tissue.  The less invasive and less painful technique has gained popularity and was featured a recent article.